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Air Conditioner Repair Tips

by HomeRepairExpert.com
A broken air conditioning unit will require the attention of a skilled technician with a set of specialized tools. An actual repair will cost the homeowner some time and money. But is the air conditioning unit really broken? A few quick checks could save you the money, time and aggravation of a repair call.

A broken air conditioning unit will require the attention of a skilled technician with a set of specialized tools. An actual repair will cost the homeowner some time and money. But is the air conditioning unit really broken? A few quick checks could save you the money, time and aggravation of a repair call.

Turn It On

Believe it or not, repair technicians often find themselves called out simply to turn the air conditioning unit on. Before making a call, look carefully at your thermostat and verify that the unit is on. Some units switch between heat and air conditioning, so check the manual if you are not sure how to set yours. Common sense tells you that the air conditioner will not go on if you have set the thermostat higher than room temperature. Verify this before making that expensive call.

Check the Breaker

Pulses of electricity and temporary overloads trigger safety features in your breaker panel that cause the breakers to switch off. This cuts power to the air conditioning unit. The switches must be turned back on manually. The breaker box is usually located in the garage or basement. Open the panel and locate the breakers for the air conditioner and furnace. They should be labeled. If one or both are off, switch them back on. If both are in the "on" position, switch them off and then on again. Listen for the air conditioner's blower to start.

Clean the Filter

Filters need replacing or cleaning (if reusable) once a month, on average. If the air conditioner is blowing, but the air is not cool, check the filter. A dirty filter can significantly reduce the amount of cold air coming out of the vents. Replace or clean the filter if you have not done it recently. This may take care of the problem.

Clean the Drain

Many air conditioning units are equipped with a safety floater switch that disconnects the condenser when the drain pipe is blocked. If the air conditioner is blowing but the air is not cool, the drain pipe may be clogged. Locate the pipe close to the ground near the outside air conditioning unit. This pipe normally drips water when the air conditioner is running. If the pipe is not dripping water, the drain needs to be cleaned. Shut the unit off and vacuum the drain. A wet/dry shop vacuum has sufficient suction to clean the drain. Once the pipe is clear, the air conditioner may cool properly.